Landowner Rights & Trail User Responsibilities

The Waskahegan Trail is a unique resource that exists only because of the generosity of landowners. Before you set foot on the trail:

  1. Know the landowner rights and the trail user responsibilities.
  2. Check the trail conditions

Mactaggart Sanctuary Winter Walk

Twenty six people came out to hike the Mctaggart Sanctuary trails in south Edmonton. What a turnout! It was exciting to catch up with people we hadn’t seen in months and to meet new hikers too. And how wonderful it was to get out in the fresh air and scenery in the company of others.

The sun shone on us the whole way. The air was frigid to start, but it gradually warmed up a few degrees. The trail had a few ups and downs, and we were grateful for our poles and the occasional hand to help us.

Whitemud Creek

We crossed the Whitemud Creek in two places. That’s something that few of us would consider doing, as we’ve always been taught to stay off the ice. But at this time of year, it seemed perfectly safe and solid.

Whitemud Creek

Along the way we stopped for warm beverages and snacks at Waves Coffee – Rabbit Hill. Here’s a shout out to Waves for the great service, considering what a large group we were.

Thank you to Dennis and Johanne for scouting and leading the hike. You can find all our photos on Flickr.

Whitemud Creek

Where we’re going next

Miquelon Provincial Park Hike

Fourteen people came out to hike the trails at Miquelon Provincial Park—our first hike in the country in a month.

The day started out sunny, and considerably warmer than the temperatures earlier in the week. The fresh layer of snow that had fallen a few days before. It did a nice job of covering the ice on the well-worn sections—making them less treacherous. But on the other sections, it was a bit tougher. We were surprised to hear that we had hiked only 8 km, because it felt like more.

As usual, we stopped for lunch at the old abandoned house.

Abandoned house in Miquelon Provincial Park

We saw chickadees and a woodpecker, but the thrill of the day was the porcupine. We saw him ahead,  up in a tree at the side of the trail. As we were approaching, he decided to climb down. We kept our distance, allowing him to cross to the other side. This picture is zoomed in and magnified.

Porcupine at Miquelon Provincial Park
Porcupine
Porcupine tracks at Miquelon Provincial Park
Porcupine tracks

And here are its tracks.

Thanks to Irene for leading the hike and to Alberta Parks and Recreation for the work they do in maintaining this treasured park. You can find more photos on Flickr.

Where we’re going next.