Landowner Rights & Trail User Responsibilities

The Waskahegan Trail is a unique resource that exists only because of the generosity of landowners. Before you set foot on the trail:

  1. Know the landowner rights and the trail user responsibilities.
  2. Check the trail conditions

Middle Coal Lake: Kjorlien Corner to Point Cooperation Hike

Last Sunday afternoon, three people came out on the holiday weekend, despite the heat and looming, thunderstorm, to hike the Middle Coal Lake part of the trail. We hiked the section from Kjorlien Corner northward to Point Cooperation.

The day was warm and overcast, with some occasional cooling breezes. Fortunately we avoided the rain, and there was only a sprinkle on the drive home.

This is a trail that has a bit of everything—a series of relatively smooth trails through the fields along the edge of the lake interspersed with a series of narrow, hilly trails through the trees.

Along the way there were 4 different kinds of berries to eat: saskatoons, raspberries, strawberries and dewberries.

And we watched the occasional pelican out over the lake.

We also spoke to one of the landowners, who reminded us to try to keep the trailheads obscure and the paths narrow to discourage ATVs.

Our lunch was at Point Cooperation, so named for the teens cleared this section as part of their summer work in 1975.

Thanks to Peggy leading the hike and to Trail Maintenance for mowing and clearing the path, and to the landowners for their continuing support. You can find more photos on Flickr.

Where we’re going next.

Middle Battle River Hike

Last Sunday, five people came out to hike the Middle Battle River part of the trail starting at Peter Fidler’s monument and going west. The day was warm and humid, with some occasional cooling breezes on the open slopes.

This is a trail that puts you right in the heart of agriculture. Much of the forested path runs alongside yellow canola fields and waving green fields of oats—a happy reminder of our food sovereignty fortune.

On a poplar-lined path along the bottom of a slope, we discovered a small herd of black cattle lying in the cooling shade. There was no way around these large creatures without “cornering” them against the fence. So, we approached gently, and they got to their feet and cleared out, allowing us to pass through safely. On the way back, we found the cattle had returned and this time there were even more of them. Who could blame them? It really is a choice spot.

Our lunch was at the site of the “old house”, which is now just a few concrete steps in a grassy field with a great view of the green and gold valley.

Thanks to Lee for scouting and leading the hike and to Trail Maintenance for mowing and clearing the path, and to the landowners for their continuing support. You can find more photos on Flickr.

Where we’re going next